Goals & Objectives

Each section of Legal Research, Writing and Analysis adhere to a uniform set of goals for each semester to ensure that all students are prepared to enter professional practice, as law clerks, after the 1L year.

FALL SEMESTER GOALS

  • Basic research skills (State and Federal systems)
    • Understand the vertical structure of the Court systems
    • Be able to locate statutes and cases
    • Be able to locate viable secondary sources
  • Basic citation skills
    • Become familiar with the different sections of the Bluebook
    • Be able to properly cite, in legal memoranda format, cases, state and federal statutes and other secondary resources
    • Be introduced to various other citation manuals and rules used within the nation and globally.
  • Understanding the elements of cases, statutes and jurisprudence
    • Be able to brief a case
    • Be able to synthesize case law to draw a predictive conclusion about a legal issue
    • Become familiar with statutes and corresponding annotations
    • Understand jurisprudence and be able to determine when authoritative vs. persuasive
  • Mastering the legal inter-office memorandum
    • Learn the basic large scale organization and structure of a memorandum
    • Learn the five basics steps of analytical reasoning
    • Understand the use of case presentations (using FIRAC) in memoranda
    • Be able to effectively communicate ideas and analysis of statutes and cases as they relate to a specific client problem.

SPRING SEMESTER GOALS

  • Build upon the basic formulas for legal thought and expression and transition students from skills relative to objective, predictive writing to the basic skills of persuasive writing.
  • Instruct students on the importance of all parts of the appellate process from trial to the notice of appeal, review of trial record and the Uniform Rules of Courts of Appeal for preparation of each part of an appellate brief.
  • Guide students from beginning to completion of an appellate brief document.
  • Enhance legal analysis and case synthesis abilities.
  • Provide introductory exposure to oral argument skills.
  • Refine computer assisted legal research skills.
  • Encourage self-dependency in legal research, analysis and thought.
  • Develop further understanding and proper use of the established systems for citation and authority.
  • Expose students to real courtroom oral argument experiences – Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal appellate arguments scheduled at the Law Center.