Judge Paul B. Landry, Jr. Commemorative Luncheon

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Pictured above are scholarship recipients Christina Welch and Carrie Stroder with Chancellor Jack Weiss during the Judge Paul B. Landry, Jr. Commemorative Luncheon.

Chancellor Jack M. Weiss held a special luncheon in September to honor the memory of the late Judge Paul B. Landry, Jr. and acknowledge his unprecedented gift of $1.13 million to the Law Center. Judge Landry was a 1936 graduate of the LSU Law Center. Prior to his death in 1998, Landry established a charitable remainder trust leaving the LSU Law Center as one of the beneficiaries of the trust proceeds. The Landry bequest is the largest gift designated for the LSU Law Center in the campaign thus far, and is being used to fund student scholarships.

Guests included family members of the late judge, his sisters Dorothy Miller and Joyce Millard, and their husbands John Miller and Irby Millard; their brother Myrton Landry and his fiancée Elverta Cook; and nieces of the judge, Vanessa Prejean, Gwen Prestridge, and Loretta Hoffman.

Law Center representatives also attending included Vice Chancellors Cheney Joseph and Glenn Morris, as well as students Christina Welch and Carrie Stroder. Welch and Stroder are currently receiving scholarships funded by the bequest. A signed giclee, Forever LSU, by artist Jack Jaubert was presented to the family by the chancellor. The painting depicts student life on the LSU campus through its 147 years of history and features prominent landmarks.

Members of the family shared stories about “Paul B,” as they called the judge, and his commitment to his studies and to the LSU Law Center. The eldest of ten children, he often hammered away on his Underwood typewriter into the early hours of the morning in preparation for his classes. His younger siblings recalled his tenacious academic spirit, and the accomplishments he achieved with his LSU Law education.

A native of West Baton Rouge Parish, Landry served as a state representative from West Baton Rouge Parish until he resigned to accept appointment to a newly created judgeship in the 18th Judicial District comprising the parishes of Iberville, West Baton Rouge, and Pointe Coupee. Judge Landry was elected to the First Circuit Court of Appeal from the First District in 1960, where he served as an appeal’s court judge and later chief judge until his retirement in 1979.

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