Second-Year Law Student to Present Paper at University of Mississippi’s First “Rethinking Mass Incarceration in the South” Conference in April

Jessica Carter, a second-year LSU Law student, will present her paper, “The Criminal Justice System is the New Slave Trade: Born into it, Living through it, But does true freedom exist?” at the University of Mississippi’s first “Rethinking Mass Incarceration in the South” conference in April.

As a first-time presenter at the conference, Carter said, “I am nervous, but honored to be surrounded by people with a similar goal of finding a sustainable solution to the mass incarceration epidemic.”

A native of Philadelphia, Mississippi, Carter said, “I have always wanted to attend law school and have the opportunity to tailor my experience around my passion for public interest.” Prior to attending LSU Law Center, Carter spent two years working for the Southern Poverty Law Center in New Orleans and Jackson, Mississippi. While based in Jackson, Carter monitored the juvenile detention facilities across Mississippi and their compliance with consent decrees.

Carter is currently an extern for Louisiana Supreme Court Chief Justice Bernette Joshua Johnson (’69). She previously had an externship with the Innocence Project in New Orleans. Carter is a member of PILS and is a Research Assistant to Teaching Fellow and Assistant Professor of Professional Practice Katherine Macfarlane.

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LibX

The Law Library would like to announce the creation of the LSU Law Library LibX browser extension for Chrome and Firefox.  Once installed, you will see a new icon next to your browser’s search bar.

With LibX you can:

  • Search the Law Library catalog, the LSU Libraries catalog, Google Scholar, HeinOnline, LegalTrac and more
  • Re-load pages to authenticate for off-campus access for pages such as journal articles
  • One-click access to check the library collection for books you find in Amazon and other popular websites

For more information and instructions to download visit: http://libguides.law.lsu.edu/libx

 

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61st Annual Mineral Law Institute to be held April 3 and 4

The 61st annual Mineral Law Institute will be held April 3 and 4 in the McKernan Auditorium at the LSU Law Center.

This two-day event attracts energy leaders from across the state and country. Topics that will be addressed include issues relating to fractional mineral conveyances, litigating the question of good faith with respect to mineral servitudes, recent revisions to the AAPL Model Form Operating Agreement that are designed to address issues raised by horizontal drilling, litigation related to coastal erosion, trends on the outer continental shelf, the Mineral Law Institute’s annual oil and gas case update, and more.

“We have an excellent program this year. We have some top notch speakers scheduled and the topics are a good mix that should appeal to just about everyone – litigators, transactional lawyers, title lawyers, and landmen,” said Keith Hall, Director of the Mineral Law Institute.

For registration information, please visit www.LSUcle.org or contact the LSU Law Center Continuing Education Department at 225-578-5837.

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LSU Law Students “Pause for a Cause”

Spring 2014 Pause for a Cause

Spring 2014 Pause for a Cause

Seventy LSU Law students donated approximately 280 hours of community service to the Baton Rouge community through the PILS Annual “Pause for a Cause” on Friday, March 14. Students volunteered at BREC, Connections For Life, the Law Center, and the Companion Animal Alliance.

“Pause for a Cause” is an annual day of service sponsored by the Law Center’s Public Interest Law Society in collaboration with the Student Bar Association.

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“The Case for New Constitutions” Event Considers Radical Constitutional Reform in the U.S. and Abroad

The public is invited to join the LSU Law Center for a film and legal discussion, The Case for New Constitutions, on Thursday, March 27, at 4:30 p.m. in the McKernan Auditorium at LSU Law Center. The Law Center is located at 1 East Campus Drive on the LSU campus. The McKernan Auditorium is located at the west entrance to LSU Law Center across the street from the Parade Grounds on Highland Rd.

Following a welcome reception, the event kicks off with the screening of Blueberry Soup, a documentary by Eileen Jerrett chronicling the aftermath of Iceland’s financial collapse that led to re-writing of the nation’s constitution. The film is a deeply touching account of an eclectic group of individuals reinventing democracy, using 21st century media such as Facebook and Twitter.

At 6:30 pm, guest speaker Professor Sanford Levinson of University of Texas School of Law, will present arguments for a new Constitutional Convention in the United States and challenge the idea that fundamental governmental principles should remain static over time. A leading critic of the U.S. Constitution and excessive presidential power, Professor Levinson will draw from the extensive research behind his recent book, Our Undemocratic Constitution: Where the Constitution Goes Wrong (and How We the People Can Correct It).

“The event offers an exciting opportunity to engage in discussion on the possibilities of constitutional reform with an influential scholar who has dedicated his career to the subject and a filmmaker immersed firsthand in a profound contemporary example of grassroots constitutionalism,” says LSU Law Professor Scott Sullivan, the event’s organizer.

The Case for New Constitutions: A Film Event with Guest Speaker Professor Sanford Levinson

4:30 Welcome reception with food and drink
5:00 Film screening: Blueberry Soup, directed by Eileen Jerrett (80 min)
6:30 Guest Speaker: Professor Sanford Levinson, University of Texas School of Law
Followed by Q&A with the director, Prof. Levinson and Prof. Scott Sullivan, LSU Law.

This program is made possible by the generous sponsorship of the International Law Society, American Constitution Society, LSU Law Center, and BUREAU of CHANGE.

For more information, please contact Professor Scott Sullivan.

About the film Blueberry Soup, by Eileen Jerrett

Blueberry Soup is an extraordinary documentary by Eileen Jerrett about the constitutional change in Iceland following the financial crisis of 2008. This is a not-well-known-story of grassroots constitutionalism, which may be a lesson or an inspiration to the rest of the world, according to the film’s director.

The film is a deeply touching account of an eclectic group of individuals reinventing democracy through rewriting the nation’s constitution, proving that Iceland is not a broken country but instead an intricate web of concerns, ideas, and ultimately creative solutions.

About the director: Filmmaker Eileen Jerrett has been praised by critics for being a pioneer in a new mode of documentary filmmaking. Her feature film Blueberry Soup began its education tour at Harvard University, sponsored by the Safra Center for Ethics, and is currently touring universities across the U.S.

About Sanford Levinson

Professor Sanford Levinson is a leading critic of the United States Constitution and excessive presidential power. In his 2006 book, The Undemocratic Constitution, he writes, “We must recognize that a substantial responsibility for the defects of our polity lies in the Constitution itself.” An advocate for radical Constitutional reform, he has called for a Second Constitutional Convention of the United States.

Professor Levinson has published over 350 articles and book reviews, edited a leading Constitutional law casebook, and is a regular contributor to the popular blog Balkinization. His most recent books include Our Undemocratic Constitution: Where the Constitution Goes Wrong (and How We the People Can Correct It) and Framed: America’s 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance.

Levinson holds the W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood, Jr. Centennial Chair in Law at the University of Texas Law School and is also a Professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas. He has been a visiting faculty member at Boston University, Georgetown, Harvard, New York University and Yale law schools. A member of the American Law Institute, Levinson was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2001. In 2010, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association.

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New Parole and Reentry Clinic Off to a Good Start

Eight eager LSU Law students are taking part this semester in the new Parole and Reentry Clinic at the LSU Law Center. Law student representatives, working under a supervising attorney, are representing clients from the Louisiana State Penitentiary, Dixon Correctional, the Barracks, Hunt Correctional, and the Louisiana Correctional Institution for Women before the Louisiana Board of Pardon and Parole.

With a strong interest in criminal defense, the Parole and Reentry Clinic was third-year law student Maggie Webster’s first choice for her last semester in law school. “As I had already taken Administrative Law, I was also interested in learning more about an administrative hearing,” said Webster. “I have learned a lot this semester about talking to actual clients, putting together briefs on their behalf and helping to articulate the cases to a panel in an honest and effective way.”

Professor Robert Lancaster, LSU Law Clinic Director, and Keith Nordyke (’79), Adjunct Clinical Professor, teach the clinic. The students have been busy learning the law and procedure, traveling to meet their clients in prison, investigating their cases, and preparing briefs and evidentiary packets. During the week of March 10, the Clinic had five hearings and the Committee granted parole in each instance.

The Parole and Reentry Clinic will be offered in fall 2014 and openings are available. Contact Professor Robert Lancaster if interested in enrolling.

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LSU Law’s Family Law Moot Court Team Takes National Semifinalist Title

Priya Kumar and Kristi Obafunwa, LSU Law Center’s Domenick Gabrielli National Family Law Moot Court Competition Team

Priya Kumar and Kristi Obafunwa, LSU Law Center’s Domenick Gabrielli National Family Law Moot Court Competition Team

The LSU Law Center’s Domenick Gabrielli National Family Law Moot Court Competition team of Priya Kumar and Kristi Obafunwa advanced as one of the Top Four teams in the nation at their competition, which was recently held at Albany Law School in Albany, New York.

Each year, the Gabrielli competition problem focuses on a cutting-edge and topical issue of family law. This year’s case file examined the issue of whether a parent commits neglect of a child where the child witnesses, but is not directly subjected to, domestic violence and whether an emergency order of removal relating to the child violated due process norms.

Professor Andrea Carroll (’00) coaches the Gabrielli Family Law team.

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2014-2015 Trial Advocacy Board Announced

The LSU Law Center’s Advocacy Programs are pleased to announce and congratulate the newly selected members of the 2014-2015 Trial Advocacy Board.  Membership on the Trial Advocacy Board is offered to those second-year students who have demonstrated excellence in and commitment to the development of trial-level litigation and alternative dispute resolution skills.

The incoming members of the 2014-2015 Trial Advocacy Board are:

Philip Adams
Annissa Alario
ReAzalia Allen
Nicholas Antaki
Alexier Barbour
Kenneth Barnes
Matthew Bergerud
Charmaine Borne
Deanna Candler
Megan Clark
Brad Cranmer
Dylan Duffey
Dan Farris
Courtney Frazier
Kiara Gradney
Anna Grand
Victoria Jowers
Emily Kunst
Carmen Liriano
Ahmed Mohamed
Lance Neyland
Scott Ogden
Phillip Prejean
Andrew Rebennack
William Wright

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Conference to Address Crisis in Immigration Representation in Louisiana

On Friday, March 28, LSU Law Center will co-sponsor, along with the Louisiana State Bar Association, Human Rights First and Loyola University College of Law, Left Out in Louisiana: Addressing the Crisis in Immigration Representation. The free conference will be held from 9:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law in the Frederick J. Gisevius Jr. Moot Court Room. The conference has been approved for 6.5 hours of CLE for all attorneys attending. Breakfast and lunch will be provided. Online pre-registration is required. Visit http://www.humanrightsfirst.org/event/left-out-louisiana to register and view the conference agenda.

In the years since Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana’s immigrant population has more than doubled. This has created a pressing need for pro bono immigration representation. Currently, 87% of the immigrants detained in Louisiana have no legal representation. “They are truly ‘left out’ and must struggle to access justice,” said Ken Mayeaux, LSU Law Center Immigration Clinic Director. Key local, state and national stakeholders will discuss how to secure justice for these immigrants, according to organizers.

Speakers include American Bar Association President Jim Silkenat, Louisiana State Bar Association President Richard Leefe and the Honorable Judge Jay C. Zainey of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana.

For additional information, please contact LSU Law Assistant Professor Ken Mayeaux at 225-578-2071.

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LSU Law Center Gains Four Spots to #72 in 2015 U.S. News Law School Rankings

The LSU Law Center continues its upward trajectory in the latest national rankings of law schools, moving up four spots to #72 in the 2015 U.S. News rankings.  The #72 ranking is the highest in LSU Law history.  The U.S. News ranking of top law schools is a closely watched list among the nation’s public and private law schools.

“Taken together, the U. S News ranking, the #3 Best Value ranking by National Jurist/Pre-law Magazine, our students’ consistently high rate of success on the Louisiana Bar Exam, and our graduates’ continuing strong performance in obtaining employment, continue to confirm that we are providing our students with a valuable legal education at a reasonable cost,” according to LSU Law Chancellor Jack M. Weiss. “Although we are all aware of the limitations of this and other ranking schemes,  it’s always a welcome relief to advance in the U.S. News rankings,” Weiss added.

Some 194 accredited law schools in the nation are reviewed by the magazine. LSU Law is one of only nine public law schools from Texas to Florida, and only one of three law schools in Louisiana, Alabama, and Mississippi, public or private, ranked in the Top 100. LSU Law entered the U.S. News Top 100 for the first time in 2004.

Factors in the rankings include: Quality Assessment (peer assessment and assessment scores by lawyers, recruiters and judges); Selectivity (median LSAT scores, median undergrad GPA and acceptance rate); Placement Success (employment rates for 2012 graduates at graduation and nine months after graduation, as well as their bar passage rate); and Faculty Resources (expenditures per student for instruction, library and supporting services and student/faculty ratio).

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